Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Life is so interesting

I think of so many things I want to say, many of them are just so random though that they are really just thoughts and nothing I could devote an entire post to. I have met some interesting people and heard some interesting stories.

This past week at work we had a man come in who was selling advertising for a local theater. He said that he would never forget March 13th. 65 years ago that day, he entered the service. He then spent 3 Christmas' in England. I thought that was an interesting way to mark time, by counting the Christmas' you missed at home.

Another lady told me of times during the war when everything was rationed and they couldn't get bananas. They then went to Canada to Niagara Falls and were able to get a big bag of bananas up there. She said they left peels all over that side of the lake.

We are so spoiled. We take so much for granted. Most of us will never know times like these people lived through. I'm sad that the older generation of today will not be the older generation we have in 20-30 years. We won't have these wonderful people who lived through the depression, the wars, the end of the 1800's and beginning of the 1900's. People who remember what life was like before cell phones, Internet, and microwaves.

I treasure every minute I get to spend with these people. It's just an added bonus that I get paid to do it.

5 comments:

vwiller said...

These are the things that we can continue to tell them about, but there is more that the next generation of older people know... segragation, korean conflict, gas rationing of the 70's...and we will have our own 9/11, fall of the Wall in Germany, and many other things. Oh and my family did not have a microwave until I was a senior in HS, I was a junior in college before email and another year before internet, and I still don't have a cell phone. Our kids will know about the things that we make sure they know.

Cheryl said...

we will the old people of their generation with own stories to pass down as well as the stories we heard from them.

Crys said...

I agree that we will have stories of our own that will be different than what our kids experience and we can also share the stories of our grandparents as well. Shawn's dad wrote an autobigraphy about his life as a child and typed it all up and gave us all a copy to share with our kids. Shawn's parents also gave us all a binder full of all the homemade recipes that they make so we can pass them on and on.......I think it's important to share our experiences, and document them if we can to be given to each generation. I have always been fascinated with that kind of stuff. I love sentiment and memories.....it gives us a better sense of who we are!

vwiller said...

I have an autobiograpgy that my greatgrandfather wrote about my family from around 1880-1935 or so including dyptheria taking his younger 4 siblings, coming to this county, meeting his wife the birth of his children (my grandmother) and his retirement...a very interesting read...even if the original is single spaced typed on the old onion skin typing paper...now it is on CDs double spaced (more then 800 pages) that I spent a summer transcribed for my sisters and other family members.Maybe I will try to get my dad to do the same type thing. We also have all of his written sermons from years as a minister. If you really think about it there is a possibility that our blogs will be like that for our kids...Maybe

Lura said...

While I agree that there will be stories to be told, I personally don't think they will compare to the lives of the current elderly.